Updates to the Transcript and Certificate Updates - Need your feedback!!!

Updates to the Transcript and Certificate Updates - Need your feedback!!!

Erika Cravens

Hello!

After reading through all the comments and feedback from my original post, we went back to the drawing board.  We have decided to make some updates to what we originally posted based on your feedback.

BUT FIRST....we want to make sure we got it right.  So, we want your feedback to confirm that we heard you correctly so we move forward in the correct way.

We agree that there was just too much complexity in the changes we were trying to communicate and so we have come up with some clear and concise definitions to start with:

  • Inactive - this means that you have not done what is necessary to keep a certification active.  Specifically, this means you did not complete the recertification requirements, or other requirements we deem necessary to keep a certification active.
  • Retired/Leagacy - this means we have retired the certification.  This can happen due to two reasons, the certification is based on technology that is more than two versions old (for example Windows Server 2000 is two versions old so it would be retired, but Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 are N and N-1 and would remain active).  The second reason is that if we deem that the certifcation is no longer valid for the purposes of the program or may be replaced, this would be something we would let you know ahead of time.

OK, so now with that said, what we need your feedback on is the words we use and the way we display the above and we have 4 options to choose from as follows:

POLL HERE: http://polldaddy.com/poll/5083983/ 

Option 1 - Use word retired, but leave in Active Section

 

Option 2 - Use word Legacy, but remain in Active section

 

Option 3 - Put in Retired Section with Messaging

 

Option 4 - Put in Legacy section with messaging

 

OK, so let us know what is your favorite and we will review and make the final decision known to all of you.

Let us know before June 15th! Please vote your preference here: http://polldaddy.com/poll/5083983/

Thanks again for all your help and feedback.  We are listening and look forward to hearing from you.

Have a great day!

Comments
  • rellufgerg
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    I'd say Option 4 is the most clear variant.

  • rellufgerg
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    I think the 4th option better than any other.

  • jbayliss
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    I vote option 3 to keep the message on point. It will then say "Retired" in both the header for the section and the description of the section.

  • rellufgerg
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    Not Clear on Inactive definition.

    If you upgraded to the latest certs e.g. .Net 4 would that mean your .Net 1.0 certs would not become inactive as you have met the latest cert requirements for the technology?

  • jbayliss
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    Oh, and also in the "retired" section, change inactive date to retired date.

  • R. Hans Rife
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    For me it is a toss-up between option 2 and option 4.

    Personally, I prefer the "legacy" term over retired due to potential negative connotations with the word retired. Retirement is best defined as the point where a person stops employment completely, whereas legacy refers to something handed down or remaining from a previous generation.

    One question I have is that on Option 2, the Enterprise Administrator shows up under active with the legacy annotation and only the achievement date; however, in option 4, the same certification shows up as normal with an inactive date. Is this by design, or merely an oversight?

  • Stephan Schwarz
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    I'd vote for option 4, legacy has a better ring to it then retired.

  • rellufgerg
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    Option 2 is the best. Legacy is far better than retired. Legacy tells someone that tech is old, retired sounds like I'm about to retire, not good on a CV. Leaving in the section with the active certs but with an explanation also makes it clear - I have the cert but its on old tech - maybe they still need someone certified on Win 2000.

  • rellufgerg
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    I'd go for Option 4 also stating "(Retired)" after certification title.

    Regards

    Nico Davis

  • rellufgerg
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    I would go for option 2. Even if the technology itself is Legacy, it could still be a wanted certification for the project or job where you want to present your transcript.  In the same time I understand that with a long certification track, you would like to only list the current active certs in one section - without some NT4 or Windows 2000 cert occuping "precious" space. Thus option 4 would be the best. Perhaps it would be possible to offer both options? Just like people compose their CV's in different ways, maybe this could be two options (the option 2 and 4 from here)

  • rellufgerg
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    I vote for number 3, the word retired makes more sense to me then legacy even though it might have a bad ring to it

  • Benjamin S
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    I would say option 4.  Can we use the explanation of "designated as legacy certifications" under the header for Legacy Certifications?  I feel this is more concise, about the two versions of product ahead of the certification.

    Also, on the dates, could we use "Legacy Date" instead?  The only certifications that need to be labeled as "Inactive Date" would be those that are required as such by ISO like the MCSA:Security with Recertification.

    I feel the Legacy name is the best option.  The certification has not expired.  With the explanation of two newer versions of the technology on the page it is clear to all involved what is meant by the word.

  • rellufgerg
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    Vote for option 2! If you want to show your transcript when applying job, nobody will be interested in any other section other than "ACTIVE".

  • rellufgerg
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    Option 4.  

    Retired in IT terms typically means turned off and unneeded.  Legacy systems are kept around, still used occasionally when needed, and still work, much like the skills that an IT pro uses and has become certified on.

    Segregating the legacy certifications from the active certifications makes it easier for a prospective employer to clearly and quickly see how many certs that an IT pro has and whether they are keeping them up-to-date, or if they are letting their skills atrophy.

  • rellufgerg
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    I would take option 4. When it comes to inactive, if MSF does not provide ways to keep a certification then it should go to Legacy Section this is 'cause at some point we would like to upgrade the certification but there are not exams available to do so.

    This post mentions "Certificates" were there any changes to certficiates from the previous post?

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